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THE COLLEGE MISERICORDIA 

VILLA ST. TERESA, DALLAS, PENNSYLVANIA 

AN INSTITUTION 

for 

THE HIGHER EDUCATION OF YOUNG WOMEN 




Conducted by 

THE SISTERS OF MERCY 

of 

Wilkes -Bar re, Pennsylvania 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

1924-1925 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Announcement 5 

Acknowledgment 6 

Foreword 7 

Calendar 8a 

College Calendar 9 

Board of Trustees 10 

Officers of Administration 12 

Faculty 13 

Special Lecture Courses IS 

Accessibility 15 

General Statement: 

Location 16 

Advantages 16 

Foundation 17 

Aims and Ideals 17 

Admission of the Students . . 18 
Admission to Freshman Class 18 

Entrance Requirements 19 

Admission to 

Advanced Standing 19 

Admission of Special Students 19 

Expenses 20 

Scale of Scholarship 21 

Requirements for Degrees 22 

Courses of Study: 

Evidences of Religion 24 

Sacred Scripture 25 

Church History 25 

Biology 26 

Chemistry 29 

Economics 31 

Education 32 

English 34 

Expression 60 

French 37 

German 39 

Greek 41 



Page 

History 43 

Home Economics 59 

Italian 47 

Latin 47 

Library Science 59 

Mathematics 49 

Philosophy 51 

Physics 53 

Political Economy 54 

Sociology 55 

Secreterial Studies 60 

Spanish 56 

Pre-Legal Course 23 

Pre-Medical Course 23 

Department of Music: 

Courses of Study 61 

Honors Awarded 61 

Theoretical Courses 61 

Practical Courses 62 

Degree Requirements 63 

Piano 64 

Violin 65 

Vocal 67 

Organ 70 

Theoretical Department 68 

Special Students 70 

Library 71 

Health and Physical Training ..71 

Chorus Singing 72 

Music and Drama 72 

Lectures and Recitals 72 

Parliamentary Law 72 

College Government 72 

Advisers 74 

Social Life 74 

Scholarships 74 

Form of Bequest 75 



Announcement 



The Sisters of Mercy, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 
announce the opening of College Misericordia, for Young 
Women, on September 24, 1924, at Villa St. Teresa, Dallas, 
Pennsylvania. 



Acknowledgment 



The Sisters desire to express their appreciation of 
the support and encouragement rendered by Right Rev- 
erend M. J. Hoban. D. D., Bishop of Scranton, and to ac- 
knowledge very gratefully the cooperation of the Rev- 
erend Clergy and friends of the College throughout the 
Diocese. 



FOREWORD 



1 be founding of a College in any community 

Tie an event of primary importance. This is 
particularly true when the College is intended 
for the higher education of women. A 

'woman is always man's first teacher and the 

better qualified she is for that position, the better it i§ 
for all mankind. It is a great pleasure therefore for 
me to be permitted to recommend to parents and guard- 
ians the new College Misericordia, which the Sisters of 
Mercy have just built at Dallas, near Wilkes-Barre. The 
Sisters of Mercy for eighty years have taught thousands 
of students in their schools, academies and colleges in the 
United States. Their ability, competency, and efficiency 
as teachers are well known and appreciated. The College 
building is architecturally beautiful and the location in 
the highlands of Luzerne County is blessed with a salu- 
brious and invigorating climate. 

I pray that the Divine Teacher may preside over this 
new home of Christian education and that He may blesi 
both teachers and students, who may dwell within it* 
walls. 

+ M. J. HOB AN, 
Bishop of Scranton. 
Bishop's House 
May 1, 1924 




RIGHT REVEREND M. J. HOBAR D. D. 

Bishop of Scranton 



CALENDAR 



1924 


1925 


1926 


July 


January 


July 


January 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 .. .. 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


August 


February 


August 


February 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


September 


March 


September 


March 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


October 


April 


October 


April 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 .. .. 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


November 


May 


November 


May 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 




12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


I 


1 


1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


December 


June 


December 


June 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T F s 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 .. .. 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1924. 



Refiitration of Candidates Sept. 22 

First Semester begins Sept. 24 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 2 7 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception (Holy Day) Dec. 8 

Christmas Vacation begins Dec. 19 



1925. 



Christmas Vacation ends Jan. 5 

Midyear Examinations begin Jan. 19 

Midyear Examinations end Jan. 26 

Spiritual Retreat for the Students Jan. 21 

Second Semester begins Feb. 2 

Easter Vacation begins Apr. 8 

Easter Vacation ends Apr. IS 

Founder's Day May 3 

Final Examinations begin May 18 

Ascension Day (Holy Day) May 21 

Final Examinations end May 25 

Baccalaureate Sermon June 7 

Commencement Exercises June 11 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

of the 
COLLEGE MISERICORDIA 



Rt. Rev. M. J. Hoban, D. D.; Rt. Rev. A. J. Brennan, S. T. D., 
Scranton, Pa.; Rev. J. J. Curran, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mother Superior of the Sisters of Mercy and the three Members 
of Council, Ex-Omcio. 

Jame3 L. Morris, Esq., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. M. E. Moore, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. P. F. Kielty, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. John A. Hourigan, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

James M. Stack, Esq., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. Joseph F. Evans, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

F. P. Slattery, Esq., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Hon. John J. Casey, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. George T. Kirkendall, Dallas, Pa. 

Mr. John Conlon, Hudson, Pa. 

Mr. Wm. P. Gallagher, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. John Redington, Dorranceton, Pa. 

Mr. M. J. Healey, Plains, Pa. 

Mr. James Mulligan, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mr. Cornelius Gallagher, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Miss M. Kirwin, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mrs. Anna O'N. Boland, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Miss Josephine Walsh, Parsons, Pa. 

Mrs. Mary Stegmaier, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 




RIGHT REVEREND A. J. BRENKfAN, S. T. D. 

Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton 



12 College Misericordia 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



RIGHT REVEREND M. J. HOB AN, D. D. 

Honorary President 



MOTHER SUPERIOR, EX-OFFICIO 

President and Treasurer 



MOTHER MARY CATHARINE, A. M, Ph. D. 

Dean 



SISTER MARIA TERESA 

Registrar 



General Information 13 

FACULTY 

MOTHER MARY CATHARINE, A. M., Ph. D. 

Dean of the College 

REVEREND ^ To ' be announced later) 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 

REVEREND JOHN J. FEATHERSTONE, A. M., J. C. L. 

Professor of Sociology 

JAMES J. WALSH, M. D., Ph. D., Sc. D., Litt D. 

Professor of Physiological Psychology 

SISTER MARY BERNADETTE, A. M. 

Professor of Comparative Literature 
Instructor in English and 
History of English Literature 

SISTER MARY PIERRE, M. S. 

Professor of Chemistry and General Science 
Instructor in Mathematics 

SISTER MARY CYRIL, A. M. 

Professor of Physics and Biology 
Instructor in Political Economy 

SISTER MARY BORROMEO, A. M. 

Professor of Latin and Greek 
Instructor in English 

SISTER MARY EULALIA, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of English and History 
Instructor in Logic 

SISTER MARY JEROME, A. M. 

Professor of Psychology and Spanish 
Instructor in Education 



14 College Misleicoedia 



SISTER MAEY GONZAGA, A. M. 
Professor of German 
Instructor in History 

SISTER MARY IMMACULATA, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics 
Instructor in English and Spanish 

SISTER MARY JAMES, A. M. 

Professor of French 

Instructor in Education and Latin 

MOTHER MARY CATHARINE, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Education 

SISTER MARY ANNUNCIATA, A. B. 

Professor of Secretarial Sciences and Economics 
Instructor in Spanish 

SISTER MARY EDUARDUS, A. B. 

Professor of Home Economics 

SISTER MARY BORGIA, MUS. B. 

Professor of Vocal Music and Piano 
Instructor in Harmony 

SISTER MARY FRANCELLA 
Librarian 
Instructor in Library Science 

SISTER MARY ALACOQUE, R. N. 

College Infirmarian 
Instructor in Home Nursing 

ROSANNA McKENNEY, M. D. 
College Physician 
Instructor in Hygiene and Physiology 



General Information 15 



SPECIAL LECTURE COURSES 



REV. T. J. McGOURTY, A. M, Ph. D. 

Latin and Greek Literature 

FREDERICK PAULDING 

Dramatic Literature 

S. M. R. O'HARA, ATTORNEY 

Parliamentary Law 



ACCESSIBILITY 

The College can be reached very easily by train, trolley, or auto- 
mobile: 

It can be reached in a half-hour by a branch of the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad. The train leaves Wilkes-Barre twice a day. 

By the Harvey's Lake car line. In Wilkes-Barre, this line may be 
taken at the "Square" which is about thirty minutes' ride to the col- 
lege. 

By the College auto-bus which will convey day pupils to and 
from the "Square," Wilkes-Barre, for school sessions and College 
functions. 

Freight, express, telegrams, and mail for those residing at the 
College should be addressed: 

College Misericordia, 
Villa St. Teresa, 
Dallas, Pennsylvania. 

The College telephone is 186. (Bell) 

Letters of inquiry and applications for bulletins should be addressed 
to 

The Registrar. 



16 College Misericoidia 



LOCATION 

The College Misericordia is located at Villa St. 
Teresa, Dallas, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, nine and 
one-half miles from the business center of Wilkes-Barre. 

The site on a wooded upland overlooking the historic, 
beautiful Wyoming Valley, mid- way between Harvey's 
Lake and Wilkes-Barre, combines the advantages of coun- 
try life with access to city privileges. 

The Campus of about one hundred acres of wood- 
land and open country is distinguished for its healthful- 
ness and beautiful scenery. 

This removal from city distractions gives the students 
opportunity to pursue their work under circumstances 
the most favorable for concentrated study. The region 
about the College is a rich field for botanical and geolog- 
ical investigation. 

The College, therefore, has a setting of unusual 
beauty. From its crowning position on the hill, the most 
attractive part of the Villa, views may be had for many 
miles of the most picturesque stretches of the Storied 
Valley. 



ADVANTAGES 

The College Misericordia enjoys advantages which 
can hardly be over-estimated. Its location near a city 
preeminently rich in educational influences, offers an un- 
paralleled equipment in the great historical collectons of 
the Wyoming Valley Historical and Geological Society, 
as well as in the fine Osterhout Library. All these facili- 
ties for research and illustration are accessible to the 
students. 



General Information 17 



FOUNDATION 

The establishment of the College Misericordia for 
girls is an answer to an insistent demand for all the ad- 
vantages of the best women's colleges, with the assurance 
that the faith of the pupil be properly safeguarded. 



The growing demand for the woman's college with 
its healthful and beautiful environment, with the assur- 
ance of individual attention to the pupils, with its se- 
lected staff of teachers, may be interpreted as the expres- 
sion of the growing consciousness of paternal responsi- 
bility in the matter of the education of children. 



AIMS AND IDEALS 

The aim of the College Misericordia is the inculca- 
tion of the noble principles and cultured ideals of Catho- 
lic scholarship and the development of an appreciation 
of all that is true, and good, and beautiful. 

The College aims to send forth women whose qualities 
of mind and heart will enable them to do their share of 
the world's work in a gracious, generous, beneficent spirit. 

The College hopes to become a powerful stimulus to 
a higher social development by making its practice meas- 
ure up to its ideals by presenting to the young women of 
the "Keystone State" the kind of education they need 
and deserve. 



18 College Misericordia 



ADMISSION OF THE STUDENTS 

Application for admission to the College Misericor- 
dia should be made as early as possible in the spring. 

To be admitted to the College, a student must be at 
least sixteen years of age; she must present satisfactory 
evidence of high moral character, good scholarship, and 
good health. 

She should have a record of her high school work 
sent by the principal to the College together with a state- 
ment of her fitness to proceed with college work. 

In addition to the above, a testimonial of character 
from other than a relative. 

The address of a responsible resident of her city with 
whom the College may communicate. 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

All candidates are requested to present entrance 
credits from one of the following sources: 

1. The College Entrance Examination Board. 

2. New York State Regents. 

3. The Catholic University of America. 

4. A Parochial High School or Academy or Public 
High School accredited by the State. 

Application for admission should be made on blanks 
which will be furnished by the Dean of the College on 
request. 

The applicant must present sixteen unit-courses of 
high school work. 

A unit-course represents a subject pursued through 
a school year of not less than thirty-six weeks, with four 
or five class periods of forty-five minutes each per week. 
Two periods of laboratory work being equivalent to one 
period of classroom work. 

Students deficient in not more than one entrance 
unit, or in the case of foreign language in two units, may 
be admitted as conditioned Freshmen. This condition 
must be removed before the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 



General Information 



1Q 



The sixteen units should be distributed as follows : 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

For the Degree of 
BACHELOR OF ARTS (A. B.) 



Prescribed 






Elective 






English 




3 units 


Two units must be 


chosen from 


Latin 




4 units 


the following subjects: 




Mathematics 




3 units 


History 




2 units 


History 




1 unit 


Modern, Language 




Vz unit 


Science 




1 unit 


Solid Geometry 




V2 unit 


Foreign Langu 


age 


2 units 


Trigonometry 




V2 unit 


(Two units 


in one 


language.) 


* Chemistry 

* Physics 

* Biology 
Music 




1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 



* Not elective if the science has been offered. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Admission for advanced standing must be accom- 
panied by official statements of courses completed in high 
school and of courses completed in college together with 
a catalogue of the college in which the advanced work 
was pursued, a testimonial of character, and a letter of 
honorable dismissal. 



ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College admits persons of mature years who de- 
sire to pursue some special line of work without follow- 
ing a prescribed course or becoming candidates for a de- 
gree. Such applicants must give evidence that they pos- 
sess the requisite ability to pursue profitably their chosen 
subjects and meet the requirements of the departments 



20 College Misericordia 

in which they wish to enroll. Special students are sub- 
ject to the general regulations regarding attendance and 
scholarship. 



EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee (payable but once) $5.00 

Board and residence 350.00 

Tuition 150.00 

Library Fee 5.00 

Laboratory Fee 5.00 

DAY COLLEGE 

Tuition 150.00 

Dinner 75.00 

The year is divided into two terms — from the open- 
ing day in September to February 1st, and from Febru- 
ary 1st to the closing day in June. Accounts should be 
paid in advance at the beginning of each term. 

No deduction is made for delay in returning at the 
beginning of the term, or for absence after entering, or 
for withdrawal before the end of the term. 

In order to secure a room it is necessary to make 
a deposit of $10.00. This deposit is forfeited in case thf 
applicant withdraws ; otherwise it is credited on the first 
payment. 

In case of serious illness of four weeks' duration or 
longer, the charges will be shared equally by the student 
and college. 



General Information 2] 



SCALE OF SCHOLARSHIP 

Reports of scholarship and general deportment are 
sent to parents or guardians at the end of each semester. 
The standing of the student is determined by the com- 
bined marks of daily class work, tests, reports or course 
papers and the mid-year and final examinations. 

The following system of marking will be used by the 
College : 

100-95% A 

94-90% B Plus 

89-85% B 

84-80% C Plus 

79-75% C 

74-65% D (Conditional) 

Below 65% E (Failure) 

Students receiving D may remove the condition by 
trying a supplementary examination. (Fee $2.00) 

Only when all conditions are removed, will a student 
be admitted to standing in her class. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

There are required for graduation 68 hours or 136 
points ; of these none may be below Grade C. Of the re- 
quired 136 points 95 must be above Grade C. In each 
semester 15 points must be above Grade C. 



» 



22 



College Misericordia 



BACHELOR OF ARTS (A. B.) 



Freshman 


Year. 




Sophomore Year. 






Sem. 


Hrs. 




Sem. Hrs. 


English 






6 


English 


4 


Latin 






8 


2 Majors 


12 


Philosophy 






4 


Science 


8 


Scripture 






2 


Philosophy 


: 2 


Religion 






2 


Psychology 


2 


Electives 






12 


Scripture 

Religion 

Electives 


2 
2 

4 


Junior Year. 






Senior Year. 








Sem. 


Hrs. 




Sem. Hrs. 


English 






4 


Philosophy 


6 


2 Majors 






12 


History 


2 


Philosophy- 






4 


Amer. History 


4 


History 






2 


Religion 


2 


Religion 






2 


Electives 


16 


Electives 






8 


2 Majors 


8 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B. S) 



Freshman 


Year. 




Sophomore 


Year. 






Sem. 


Hrs. 






Sem. Hrs. 


English 






6 


Majors 




16 


Mod. Languages 






6 


Mod. Languages 




6 


Mathematics 






6 


Philosophy 




2 


Science 






8 


Religion 




2 


Religion 






2 


Electives 




10 


Scripture 






2 


k 






Electives 






6 








Junior Year. 






Senior Year. 








Sem. 


Hrs. 






Sem. Hrs. 


Majors 






16 


Majors 




12 


English 






4 


History 




2 


History 






2 


Philosophy 




4 


Religion 






2 


Religion 




2 


Electives 






10 


Electives 




12 



General Information 



23 



BACHELOR OF LETTERS (LITT. B.) 



Freshman Year. 




Sophomore 


Year. 




Sem. 


Hrs. 






Sem. Hrs. 


English 




3 


English 




3 


Modern Language 




3 


Modern Language 




3 


History 




3 


Economics 




2 


Classical Civilization 




3 


Apologetics 




1 


Physical Education & Hygiene 3 


Physical Education 




2 


Apologetics 




1 


Electives 




7 


Oral English 




1 








Junior Year. 






Senior Year. 






Sem. 


Hrs. 






Sem. Hri. 


Philosophy 




3 


Philosophy 




3 


Major 




6 


Major 




6 


Apologetics 




1 


Sociology 




2 


Hist, of Religion 




1 


Apologetics 




1 


Electives 




6 


Electives 




5 



PRE-LEGAL COURSE 

The Pre-Legal Course covers three academic years 
and is intended to give the student a thorough training 
in the fundamental principles of American jurisprudence. 
College entrance requirements must be complied with by 
students desiring this course. 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 



The Pre-Medical Course covers two years of College 
work and is intended to prepare the student for admis- 
sion to a medical school. It is planned to meet the re- 
quirements of the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges. Students for this course must satisfy the full re- 
quirements for college entrance. 



24 College Misericordia 



COURSES OF STUDY 



EVIDENCES OF RELIGION 

1. Apologetics: Christian Revelation; The Church. 

Revelation in general; Christianity a revealed religion; Patri- 
archal and Mosaic Revelation; Divine origin of the Christian 
Revelation; The Church; its institution and end; Constitution of 
the Church. 

Freshmen. One hour a week, first semester. Two credits. 

2. Tue Church; God and Salvation. 

Marks and Teaching office of the Church; Holy Scripture and 
Tradition; the rule of Faith. God the Author and Restorer of our 
salvation; God considered in Himself; One in Nature; His Exist- 
ence, Nature, Attributes, Unity; The Trinity. 

Freshmen. One hour a week, second semester. One credit. 

3. Creation and Redemption. 

Creation; the spiritual world; the material world. Man and 
the Fall. God the Redeemer; the person and nature of the Re- 
deemer; the work of Redemption. 

Sophomores. One hour a week, first semester. One credit. 

4. Grace and the Sacraments. 

Actual, habitual and sanctifying grace; infused and acquired 
virtues; Pelagianism. Jansenism, Naturalism and other errors re- 
futed. The Sacraments in general; Baptism; Confirmation; the 
Holy Eucharist as a Sacrament and as a Sacrifice. 

Sophomores. One hour a week, second semester. One credU. 

5. The Sacraments; Morality and Virtue. 

The Sacrament of Penance. Extreme Unction, Holy Orders 
and Matrimony; Sacramentary errors refuted; The basis of mor- 
ality; law, conscience and free will; moral good and moral evil. 
The Christian's duties toward God; natural and supernatural vir- 
tues; Faith, Hope, and Charity; the last Things. 

Juniors. One hour a week, first semester. One credit. 



Evidences of Religion 25 



6. Divine Worship; Christian Perfection. 

Internal and external worship due to God; direct and indirect 
acts of worship; veneration of the Saints. The Christian's duties 
toward self and neighbor; works of supererogation. 

Juniors. One hour a week, second semester. One credit. 



SACRED SCRIPTURE 

1. General Introduction to the Old Testament. 

Number and Classification of the books, the Hebrew Bible; 
Greek, Latin, and English Versions. 
Special Introduction. 

Analysis of Contents, Peculiarities of Matter and Form of 
some of the Old Testament Books. 

Freshmen. One hour a week, each semester. Two credits. 

2. General Introduction to the New Testament. 

Notion, Contents and Division of the New Testament. The 
Gospels. The Life of Christ as portrayed by the Gospels; His 
miracles, prophecies, parables and discourses. Acts of the Apostles. 

Sophomores. One hour a wtek, each semester. Two credits. 



CHURCH HISTORY 

r^— 

History of the Church. 

A survey of the Church in its spiritual and temporal aspects from 
the time of the Apostles to the present day. Chief topics studied; the 
spread of Christianity in the first centuries, the growth of the temporal 
power of the Pope, the important Church Councils, the foundation of 
the great religious orders, the character of mediaeval religious life, the 
Reformation and its relation to the Great Schism and the Renaissance, 
the Counter-Reformation and its results, and the Catholic revival of 
the nineteenth century. 

Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week, each semester. Two 

credits. 



26 College Misericordia 



BIOLOGY 



GROUP A— BOTANY 

1. *General Botany. 

An introductory study of the classification and structure of 
plants. 

Open to all students. Elective. Two hours a week. First 
semester. 

2. *Plant Physiology. 

A general study of the functions of absorption, respiration, 
transpiration, and photosynthesis in seed plants. 

Open to all students. Two hours a week. Second semester. 
Two credits. 

3. * Local Flora. 

A course designed primarily to acquaint the student with the 
common plants in the vicinity of the College; to give a working 
knowledge of group characteristics; and to teach the use of 
manuals. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1-2. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours, including field trips. 
One semester. Two credits. 

4. *Plant Ecology. 

Theoretical and experimental study of plants in relation to 
the ecological factors in their environment; light, water, tempera- 
ture, and soil. Also a study of the types and origin of plant as- 
sociations, etc. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1-2-S. Lecture, one hour; recitation, 
one hour. One semester. Laboratory two hours. Two credits. 
Open to Sophomore students having a grade of B in Botany 1-2. 
* Limited credit course. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 27 



5. General Bacteriology. 

An introductory study of the hygienic and industrial aspects 
of bacteriology, and of the basic principles of the science, together 
with the study of a series of yeasts, molds, and non-pathogenic 
bacteria in the laboratory. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Lecture, one hour; recitation, 
one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. Four credits. 

6 General Morphology of Thallophytes, Bryophytes, and Pteri- 
dophytes. 

An intensive study of several forms of Algae and Fungi. De- 
tailed study of the structure and development of the typical genera 
of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. Two 
credits. 

7. General Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. 

A general theoretical study of extinct gymnosperm groups, 
with an intensive experimental study of existing groups. A thor- 
ough study of the various tissues of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, 
fruits, etc., of both Monocotyledonous and Dicotyledonous forms. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. Two 
credits. 

8. Elementary Plant Pathology. 

A consideration of the principal parasitic forms of plants and 
animal life and their pathogenic effects upon plants. Special em- 
phasis is placed upon the study of the more ordinary garden and 
greenhouse pests, and the methods of treating them. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. 
Two credits. Open to sophomores having a grade of B in Botany 
6. {Prerequisite 1-2-6.) 

9. Advanced Plant Physiology I. 

A study of the relations of structure and function in plant 
organs, with special reference to osmosis, conduction of water and 
food materials, plant products, transpiration, photosynthesis, diges- 
tion, enzymes, respiration and energy. 

Prerequisites: Botany 1-2-8; Physics 1; and Chem- 
istry 1-2. Lecture, one hour; recitation, one hour; laboratory, 
two hours. One semester. Two credits. 



28 College Misericordia 



10 Advanced Plant Physiology II. 

A thorough study of the phenomena of growth and move- 
ment, irritability, tropisms, nastic curvatures, automatic movements 
etc. 

Prerequisites: Botany 1-2-8-9; Physics 1 ; and Chemistry 
1-2. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. 
Two credits. 

11. Plant Histology. 

The fundamental principles and methods of histological tech- 
nique. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1-2-8-6-7. Lecture, on$ hour; labora- 
tory, two hours. One semester. Two credits. 

12. Teachers' Course in Botany. 

A course in which the students make a critical study of the 
methods of teaching Botany in high schools, and test the value of 
these methods by their practical application in practice teaching. 
Minimum essentials, standardized tests, laboratory management and 
methods, suitable equipment and the collection and preservation of 
materials are likewise considered. 

Prerequisites: Botany 1-2 ; Psychology 1. One semester. 



GROUP B— ZOOLOGY 

13. General Zoology. 

A general view of the classification and evolution of the animal 
kingdom, with a thorough study of the structure and physiology 
of a series of representative forms. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. 
Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 29 



GROUP C— PHYSIOLOGY 

14. Human Physiology. 

A summary view of the anatomical structure of the human 
body; a thorough study of the fundamental principles of its Physi- 
ology and hygiene; and a consideration of the more important 
advances in science. 

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. One semester. Two 
credits. 



CHEMISTRY 

1. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry. 

A course in the fundamental principles of the sciences together 
with the descriptive chemistry of the non-metals and metals. The 
lectures and demonstrations are supplemented by laboratory work. 

Required of all who have not completed a satisfactory course 
in Chemistry. Two lectures, one laboratory period weekly. Fresh- 
man. Three credits. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

A review of the fundamental principles of the science and of 
the descriptive chemistry of the non-metals. It supplements the 
work in Chemistry I which is a prerequisite and adds a treatment 
of modern chemical theory. 

Sophomore. First semester, four credits. Three lectures, one 
laboratory period weekly. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. 

The principles of analytical chemistry. Descriptive chemistry 
of the metals. Separation of the metals and determination of 
acidradicals from the standpoint of electrolytic dissociation and 
chemical equilibria. 

Sophomore. Second semester, four credits. Two lectures, two 
laboratory periods weekly. 



30 College Misericordia 



4. Quantitative Analysis. 

The principles and methods involved in gravimetric and vol- 
umetric determinations. The course is not planned to make the 
student an expert in any special technical line, yet the work covers 
many of the common methods of technical analysis. 

Junior. First semester, three credits. One lecture, two labora- 
tory periods weekly. 

5. Food Chemistry. 

The general methods in examining food materials as to their 
character, purity, and nutritive values. Typical food products are 
analyzed. Discussion of food preservation and adulteration. 

Junior. Second semester, three credits. One lecture, two lab- 
oratory periods weekly. 

6. Organic Chemistry. 

A course consisting of lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work. A careful study is made of the principal classes of the com- 
pounds of carbon. 

Five hours weekly. Four credits. Open to students who have 
completed I 

7. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

A course offering an opportunity for more extended study and 
investigation to those who have completed Chemistry I. 

8. Physical Chemistry. 

Lectures, recitations, laboratory work. 

Four credits. Four hours weekly. Open to students who have 
completed $, h and Physics 1. 

9. Historical Chemistry. 

This course treats of the beginnings of Chemistry and its de- 
velopment to modern times. 

One semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. Open to 
students who have completed I. 



Liberal Arts and Science? 31 



10. Teachers' Course. 

A course for seniors who expect to teach. Those admitted 
must have completed Chemistry 2 with at least B standing. For 
special reasons juniors may sometimes be admitted to this class. 
Attendance at the lectures given in Chemistry I is required as well 
as a certain amount of regular teaching work. 

Two hours weekly. Second semester, three credits. 



ECONOMICS 



Principles of Economics. 

An introductory discussion of the laws relating to the produc- 
tion and to the consumption of wealth. The subject matter will 
be developed by lectures, class discussions, assigned readings and 
by written reports upon special subjects. 

Two hours a week. Four credits. Required. Sophomore year. 

Industrial History of the United States. 

Industrial problems of the Colonial and Revolutionary periods 
of History; the origin and growth of the tariff; economic condi- 
tions and problems of the Civil War and Reconstruction; con- 
temporary problems. 

One hour a week. Two credits. 



32 College Misericordia 



EDUCATION 

The courses in this department are designed to furnish professional 
training for those who are preparing to become teachers. In order to 
meet the requirements of teachers who teach in the high schools ac- 
credited to the Middle Atlantic and Maryland Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, those who anticipate teaching are required to 
complete courses including psychology. The work is planned to meet 
the requirement also of the Department of Education of the State of 
Pennsylvania, for a state certificate entitling the holder to teach in the 
high schools of the state. To meet the varying requirements of other 
states, courses are offered which students who anticipate teaching in 
those states may elect. 

For the prospective teacher the following courses are required: 
Educational Psychology, three credits. 

Principles of Education or History of Education, three credits 
each. 

Departmental Teachers' Course, two credits. Courses in Edu- 
cation are open to Juniors and Seniors only. 

Psychology, see Philosophy I, is prerequisite to all Courses in 
this Department. 

1. Introduction to Education. 

An elementary course to introduce students to the scientific 
study of education. A study of educational problems; grouping 
pupils, principles influencng the organization of the curriculum, 
standardization, selected administrative problems. 

Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

2. History of Education. 

A brief survey of educational procedure from primitive times 
to the modern period; emphasis upon the history of modern edu- 
cational theory and practice. 

Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

3. Educational Psychology. 

A study of individual differences; inheritance of mental traits; 
formal discipline, mental fatigue, economy in learning. 
Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences "53 



4. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Fundamental conceptions of secondary education; articulation 
with the elementary school, the college, the community, the home. 
Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

5. Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

Selection and arrangement of subject matter; economy in class 
room management; observation of teaching in neighboring high 
schools. 

Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

6. Educational Measurements. 

A study of the use and application of standardized measure- 
ments for determination of mental ability and progress in learning 
efficiency. 

Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

7. Educational Administration. 

Administrative problems; organizing pupils for effective group 
and individual attention, discipline; extension of school ac- 
tivities. 

Two hours a week for one semester. Two credits. 

8. Philosophy of Education. 

A special study of the basic principles underlying educa- 
tional theory. The meaning and function of education are studied 
in the light of the doctrine of development. There will be a special 
study of the fitting of the individual to take her place in the 
industrial and social world. 

One year, two hours weekly. Four credits. 

9. General Methods. 

This course will deal with the fundamental principles of teach- 
ing various subjects in the light of the principles developed 
in the courses of the Philosophy and Psychology of Education. 

One Semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 



^^^""™" 



34 College Misericordia 



10. Special Methods. 

Courses in special methods will be found in tie respective de- 
partments. 

ENGLISH 

1. Rhetoric and Composition. 

Constant practice in writing especially in exposition. Critical 
reading of some modern essays, oral composition, class criticism, 
conferences, and occasional supplementary lectures. 

Prescribed for Freshmen. First semester, two hours weekly. 
Two credits. 

2 . Argumentation. 

Critical study of selected arguments. Analysis of topics drawn 
from history and contemporary thought. At least one long brief 
and the corresponding forensic. Class debates. 

Prescribed for Freshmen. Second semester, two hours weekly. 
Two credits. 

3. Chaucer and Spenser. 

A study of the best known of the Canterbury Tales. One book 
of the Faery Queene. 

Prescribed for Sophomores making English a major. First 
semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 

4. The Early English Drama. 

Mysteries, miracles, and moralities. Beginnings of the regular 
drama. Comedy, tragedy, history. Immediate predecessors of 
Shakespeare. 

Prescribed for Sophomores making English a major. Second 
semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 

5. English Literature. 

From the Renaissance to the eighteenth century. A study of 
religious, social, and political ideas as revealed in the writings of 
this period, with special attention to the development of the ideals 
of modern democracy. 

Prescribed for Sophomores. First semester, two hours weekly. 
Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 35 



6. The Eighteenth Century and the Era of Revolution. 

A continuation of Course 5. Pope, Addison, and other writ- 
ers are studied principally in their criticism of social life and in 
their political ideals. The desire for liberty is traced in the Eng- 
lish poets from Burns to Wordsworth, and in political writers on 
both sides of the Atlantic. 

Prescribed for Sophomores. Second semester, two hours weekly. 
Two credits. 

7. Composition. 

First semester, exposition. Practice in making of bibliographies 
and the writing of formal and informal essays. Second semester, 
the study of prose narratives and verse forms with practice in 
writing. 

Open to Sophomores. One hour a week for the year. Two 
credits. 

8. Shakespeare. 

Life and works. Detailed study of four plays, with reading 
and discussion of the most important histories, comedies, and 
tragedies. 

Prescribed jor Juniors making English a major. First semester, 
two hours weekly. Two credits. 

9. Milton. 

His life, purpose, and achievement. Study of Paradise Lost, 
Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. 

Open to Juniors. Second semester, one hour weekly. One 
credit. 

10. Nineteenth Century Literature. 

A study of the Romantic, Oxford, Pre-R.aphaelite, and Celtic 
movements, and of the Catholic Renaissance. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week jor the year. 
Offered if elections warrant. Four credits. 



36 College Misericordia 



11. American Literature. 

A study of the literary development of America, with emphasis 
upon the influencing political and philosophical movements, sec- 
tional characteristics, and writers of distinction. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week for the year 
or four hours a week for one semester. Four credits. 

1 2 . Versification . 

English poetry studied from a structural and from an aesthetic 
point of view. Practical exercises in the construction of stanzas, 
sonnets, and other forms of verse. 

Prescribed in the first semester for Juniors making English a 
major. One hour weekly. One credit. 

13. English and American Essayists. 

A study of the development of the essay form and readings 
in selected English and American essayists. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two or three hours a week for 
one semester. Three credits. 

14. The Novel. 

A brief historical study with emphasis on the representative 
novelists of the nineteenth century. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week for the year. 
Four credits. 

15. An intensive study of Tennyson, Browning or some other nine- 
teenth-century poet. 

Open to Seniors. One hour weekly. Two credits. 

16. Old English Prose. 

The course aims to give a reading knowledge of Anglo-Saxon. 
Text. Bright, Anglo-Saxon Reader. 

Open to Seniors. Three hours a week for one semester. Three 
credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 37 

17. Greek Poetry from Homer to Theocritus. 

A reading course in translation of the Iliad, Odyssey, lyric 
poetry, and selected dramas. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two or three hours a week for 
one semester. Three credits. 

18. Contemporary Literature. 

Lectures and discussions based on the literary tendencies of 
contemporary English and American authors. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week for ont 
semester or one hour for the year. Two credits. 

19. Short Story Writing. 

Open to Seniors. One hour weekly. Two credits. 

20. The Teaching of English. 

A study in the methods of teaching composition and literature 
in secondary schools. Observation and supervised practice teaching. 
Open to Seniors. Two hours a week for one semester. Two 
credits. 



FRENCH 

1. Elementary Course. 

Special study of irregular verbs. Reading of modern prose. 
This course, conducted partly in French and partly in English, is 
intended to secure a reading knowledge of the language. 

Open to students who did not present French. Three hours 
weekly. No credit. 

2. Prose Composition. 

Special study of syntax. Reading of modern authors. Selec- 
tions, prose and poetry, committed to memory. 

Open to students who presented minor requirements in French. 
Two hours weekly. Four credits. 



38 College Misericordia 



3. Advanced French Grammar, Reading and Dictation. 

Open to students who presented Major requirements in French, 
but who have not had sufficient practice in speaking the language. 
Two hours weekly. Four credits. 

4. Advanced French Composition and Reading. 

Open to students who have completed French 3 or 11. Two 
hours weekly. Four credits: 

5. History of the Literary Movement in the Nineteenth Century. 

A study of Romanticism, the new influences, fiction, history, 
drama. Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, Lamartine, Hugo, Vigny, 
Musset, Gautier, Balzac, Sand, Merimee, Michelet. 

Both semesters. Three hours tveekly. Six credits. 

6. A rapid review of French literature dealing only with writers of first 
importance. 

Open to all students with permission of the Professor. One 
hour weekly. Two credits. 

7. Elementary French conversation and composition. French phonetics. 

Talks on assigned reading. 

Open to Freshmen with the permission of the Professor. One 
hour weekly. Two credits'. 

8. French conversation. Oral composition. Talks on French history. 

Open to Sophomores with permission of the Professor. One hour 
weekly. Two credits. 

9. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. 

Discussions on current topics. 

Open to Juniors making French a major. One hour weekly. 
Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 39 



10. French Social Life and Manners. 

Short lectures on assigned topics by students. 
Open to Seniors making French a major. One hour weekly. 
Two credits. 

11. Outline of French Literature from its origin to the seventeenth 
century. Composition, reading, and recitation. 

Open to students who presented major requirements in French. 
Three hours weekly. Three credits. 

12. Teachers' Course. 

A study of the aims and methods in teaching French. A re- 
view of the esssentials of grammar. Pronunciation, reading, and 
composition. Practice in teaching. 

Open to Seniors with permission of the Professor. One hour 

weekly. 



GERMAN 

1. Elementary German. 

Grammar. Reading with practice in writing and speaking 
German. 

Open to students who did not present German at entrance. 
Two hours weekly. No credit. 

2. Grammar and Composition. 

Reading and conversation. 

Open to students who presented minor requirements in German. 
Two hours weekly. Two credits. 

3. Advanced Grammar and Composition. 

Conversation. 

Open to students who presented major requirements in German. 
Three hours weekly. Three credits. 



1 



40 College Misericordia 



4. Grammar. 

Prose composition. This course is designed to meet individual 
needs of students. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. One hour weekly. Two 
credits. 

5. Elementary Conversation and Composition. 

Open to students who completed 2 or equivalent. One hour 
weekly. Two credits. 

6. The Classical Drama. 

Dramas of Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller are read and interp- 
reted. 

Prescribed for Sophomores making German a major. Three 
hours weekly. Six credits. 

7. Advanced Conversation and Composition. 

Open to students who completed k or 10. One hour weekly. 
Two credits. 

8. History of German Literature. 

General survey of German literature from the earliest times 
to the present. 

Open to students who completed 6 or 7. Two hours weekly. 
Four credits. 

9. Conversation. 

Discussion of current events and assigned topics. 
Prescribed for students making German a major. One hour 
weekly. Two cerdits. 

10. Methods of Teaching German. 

Open to Seniors. Second semester. Two hours weekly. Two 
credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 41 



GREEK 



1. Elementary Course. 



Grammar, exercises in writing. Xenophon's Anabasis. 
Open to students who do not present Greek at entrance. Two 
hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis continued. 

Selections from the New Testament. Elementary prose com- 
position. 

Open to students who have finished Greek I or who presented 
minor Greek at entrance. Three hours a week, each semester. Six 
Credits. 

3. Lysias, Selected Orations; Plato, Apology. 

Study of legal proceedings in the Athenian courts; lectures on 
Socrates and the Socratic method. Exercises in prose composition. 

Freshmen. Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 
Prerequisite, Courses 1-2 or three units of Greek offered at entrance. 

4. Homer Odyssey. 

Four books entire and selections from other books. Special 
study of Homeric forms and syntax. Exercises in prose composi- 
tion. 

Freshmen. Three hours a week, second semester. Three cred- 
its. Greek 3-4 or Latin 1-2 are prescribed for Freshmen who are 
candidates for the A. B. degree. 

5. Euripides, Medea and Alcestis. 

Rise and development of Greek tragedy; Euripides' treatment 
of the traditional plots; his ethical tendencies. 

Sophomores. Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 

6. Demosthenes, Philltpic or Olynthiac Orations. 

The development of Attic Oratory; Demosthenes as an orator 
and statesman. 

Sophomores. Three hours a week, second semester. Three 
credits. 



42 College Misericordia 



7. Thucydides, Books I, VI, VII. 

The Athenian Empire, the Sicilian expedition. Special study 
of Thucydides as a speechwriter. 

Juniors. Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 

8. Sophocles, Antigone and Oedius Tyrannus. 

These two plays are carefully read, and the contents of the 
other extant plays of Sophocles studied in outline. 

Juniors. Three hours a week, second semester. Three credits. 

9. Plato, Phaedo and Selections from other Dialogues. 

Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 

10. Aeschylus, Promtheus Bound and Persians. 

Religious and moral ideas of Aeschylus. 

Seniors. Three hours a week, second semester. Three credits. 

11. Greek Drama. 

A general course, including the origin and development of the 
Greek Drama, study of the Greek theatre, Aristotle's Theory of 
Tragedy, reading and criticism of selected plays of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. 

Seniors. Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 

12. Greek Poetry. 

Selections from the Elegaic, iambic and lyric poets. 

Seniors. Three hours a week, second semester. Three credits. 

13. New Testament and Patristic Greek. 

Special study of the writings of St. Luke. Selections from St. 
John Chrysostom, St. Basil and other Fathers. 

Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week, each semester. Six 
credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 



14. Composition and Syntax. 

A study of the essential principles; constant practice in trans- 
lating into Greek. 

Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week, each semester. Two 
credits. 

15. History of Greek Literature. 

Lectures and selected readings with a careful study of the liter- 
ary development of the language in both prose and poetry. 

Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week, second semester. 
Three credits. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCES 

The new part that women must take in the solving of economic, 
political, and social problems makes it imperative that the department 
of Social and Political Science furnish a standard of judgment. This 
standard must be built on a knowledge of past experience and of pres- 
ent conditions together with the underlying principles of develop- 
ment controlling the history of civilization. This department aims to 
supply a clear grasp of the significance of the above factors. 

The department includes: 

A. History 

B. Government 

C. Economics 

D. Sociology and Anthropology 



HISTORY 

1. Mediaeval History. 

General history of Europe from the rise of Christianity in the 
Roman Empire to the close of the fifteenth century. 

Required of Freshmen. Two hours a week, each semester. 
Four credits. 



44 College Misericordia 



2. Modern European History. 

A general survey of religious, political, social, economic, and 
intellectual movements of Modern Europe from the close of the 
fifteenth century to the present time. 

Sophomores. Two hours a week each semester. Four credits. 

3. Mediaeval Civilization. 

A special study of society, learning and the arts in the Middle 
Ages, and of the leaders of mediaeval thought and culture. 

Not open to Freshmen. Two hours a week, first semester. 
Four credits. 

4. Modern England. 

History of England from the opening of the sixteenth century 
to the present day. A study of the religious changes, political 
movements, social, economic and intellectual forces which have 
contributed to the making of present day England. 

Not open to Freshmen. Two hours a week, each semester. 
Four credits. 

5. American History A. 

A survey of the period from the discovery to the close of the 
Civil War. Attention is directed especially to the development of 
the constitution and the growth of democracy. 

Two hours, first semester. Two credits. 

6. American History B. 

A continuation of 5, covering the period from the Civil War 
to the present time, with the principal emphasis placed on the 
years of reconstruction. The aim is to present the historic back- 
ground of the economic and social problems of today. 

Two hours a week, second semester. Two credits. 

7. Recent History of The United States, 1876-1921. 

A study of contemporary American political, economic and 
social problems; foreign relations; participation of the United States 
in the World War. 

Not open to Freshmen. Two hours a week, each semester. 
Four credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 45 



8. American Constitutional History. 

A study of the origin and nature of political institutions; rise 
of political parties; development of party machinery; evolution of 
political issues; origin of the Constitution; interpretation; growth 
and development; results of development; courts and Constitution. 

Three hours a week, first semester. Three credits. 

9. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era. 

Causes and movements of the French Revolution; rise of Na- 
poleon Bonaparte; development of the Napoleonic Empire and its 
constitutions; War of Liberation; reorganization of Europe. 

Prerequisite, Course 2. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two 
hours a week, each semester. Four credits. Alternates with 
Course 10. 

JO. Europe Since 1815. 

Governments of Europe according to reorganization of 1815; 
spirit of reaction; spirit and tendencies of Liberalisim; industrial 
changes; revolutionary and nationalist movements; political and 
social reforms; European expansion and international rivalries; 
development of national imperalism; Europe on the eve of the 
war; the World War. 

Prerequisite, Course 2. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two 
hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

Alternates with Course 9. 

11. Contemporary History. 

A course aiming to apply the methods of historical evidence 
and research to current events. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week, second 
semester. Two credits. 

12. Irish History. 

From the introduction of Christianity to the present time. 

Special attention is given to the art, literature and music of 
the Irish people, and to the political, social and industrial problems 
of Ireland. 

Open to all students. One hour a week, two semesters. Two 
credits. 



46 College Misericordia 



13. Current Events. 

Problems arising from current events; their causes and in- 
fluences. 

Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week, each 
semester. 

14. Bibliography. 

Study of general historical bibliographies. 

15. Latin American History. 

A general survey of the Latin American States from the dis- 
coveries and explorations to the present time. 

Two hours a week, first semester. Two credits. 

16. History of Russia. 

From the earliest times to the present day. 
Two hours a week, second semester. Two credits. 

17. Method or Historical Research. 

The principals of historical evidence, the processes of historical 
research, scientific methods in history, the rival claims of literature 
and science in historical composition, biography. 

This work will be given in lectures supplemented by a display 
of historical materials and the assignment of reference reading from 
such works as those of Pathof, Retberg, and others. 

Open to Seniors. One hour a week, each semester. Two 
credits. 

18. The Teaching or History. 

Discussion of the value of history as an educational subject; 
problems and methods of teaching; practical helps in methods of 
presenting subjects in class; comparative study of methods and 
material; bibliography and use of library; lesson planning and 
illustrative material. 

Open to Seniors. One hour weekly. Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 47 



ITALIAN 



1. Elementary Italian. 



Grandgent, Italian Grammar; Bowen, Italian Reader; Testa, 
L'Oro e 1 'Orpelle; Goldoni, II Vero Amico, La Locandiera, Un 
Curioso Accidente; Silvio Pellico, Le Mie Prigioni. 

Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

2. Intermediate Course. 

Grandgent; Italian Composition; Manzoni, I Promessi Sposi; 
Alfieri, Saule; Selections from Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. 
Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

3. Dante and the Early Renaissance. 

Readings from the Vita Nuova and the Divina Commedia, the 
sonnets of Petrarch and the Tales of Boccaccio. 

Seniors. Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

4. History of Italian Literature in the Nineteenth Century. 

Seniors. One hour a week, each semester. Two credits. 

LATIN 

1. Selections from Livy. 

Translation of prepared and sight passages; study of Livy's 
style. Prose composition: drill in the principles of syntax and sen- 
tence structure, practice in writing. 

Freshmen. Two hours, first semester. Two credits. 

2. Horace, Selected Odes and Epodes. 

Study of Horace's style and metres, life and personality. 
Prose composition; continuation of work of first semester. 
Freshmen. Two hours, second semester. Two credits. 

3. Cicero, Letters. 

Tacitus, Agricola. Horace, Satires and Epistles. Ovid, Selec- 
tions. Prose composition. 

Prescribed for Sophomores in the Latin groups. Both semes- 
ters. Two hours weekly. Four credits. 



48 College Misericordia 



4. History of Latin Literature. 

Reading of representative selections. 

Prescribed for Juniors in the Latin groups. Both semesters, 
two hours weekly. Four credits. 

5. Selections from Latin Poets. 

Attention is given to the tendencies of the age and the in- 
fluence of the Alexandrian School as exemplified in the selections 
read. 

One semester. Three hours. Three credits. Elective for 
Sophomores. 

6. Roman Life. 

Selected readings from Pliny, Letters; Juvenal, Satires; Mar- 
tial, Epigrams. 

Prescribed for Juniors in the Latin groups. Both semesters, 
one hour weekly. Two credits. 

7. General Review of Latin Syntax. 

Practice in writing Latin. 

Prescribed for Juniors in the Latin groups. Both semesters, 
one hour weekly. 

8. Roman Comedy. 

Plautus and Terence, Selected Plays. 

Elective for Seniors in the Latin groups. Both semesters, two 
hours weekly. Four credits. 

9. Roman History. 

Readings from Livy, Sallust, Tactius, Suetonius. 
Elective for Seniors in the Latin groups. Both semesters. Two 
hours weekly. Four credits. 

10. Virgil's Aeneid. 

This course is intended for advanced students. The aim will 
be to present the first six books of the Aeneid as a masterpiece 
of epic poetry. Some attention will be given to the last six books 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 49 



also, that the purpose and unity of the Aeneid as a whole may be 
made clear. 

Both semesters, two hours. Four credits. 

11. History of Roman Literature. 

This course presents a complete survey of, and introduction 
to the history of classic Roman literature from Livius Andronicus 
to Gellius. 

Both semesters, two hours. Lectures and assigned readings. 
Four credits. 

12. The Teaching or Latin. 

A rapid review of high school Latin; study of methods of 
teaching; visiting of classes; practice teaching; reports and dis- 
cussions. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week for one 
semester. Two credits. 



MATHEMATICS 

1. Solid Geometry. 

Demonstrations of propositions; applications of principles to 
numerical examples. 

One semester, three hours weekly. 3 credits. 

2. Trigonometry. 

Plane and Spherical. Trigonometric Analysis; solution of tri- 
angles; application of principles to problems; goniometry; Napier's 
rules; Napier's Analogies; Gauss's Formulae; applications. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 

3. Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry. 

The esssentials of Plane Trigonometry and Plane Analytic 
Geometry as required for sciences. 

One year, three hours weekly. Three credits. 

4. Advanced Algebra. 

One semester, three hours wekly. Three credits. 



m 



50 College Misericordia 



5. Analytic Geometry. 

Equations and fundamental properties of the point, right line, 
circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 
Open to students who have taken 2. 

6. Calculus, Differential and Integral. 

Differentiation; expansion of functions; evaluation of indetermi- 
nate forms; maxima and minima; general properties of plane 
curves; application of both the single and double integration. 

One year, three hours weekly. Six credits. 

Open to students who have taken 2, 4, and 5, or 3. 

7. Theory of Equations and Determinants. 

Continuation of 4. Some of the fundamental properties of an 
algebraic equation in one unknown; solutions of systems of simul- 
taneous equations; fundamental properties of determinants. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 

Open to students who have taken 2, 4, and 5, or 8. 

8. Calculus (Second Course). 

More detailed study of the principles of Differentiation and 
Integration. Partial differentiation, maxima and minima of two and 
three dimensions, definite integrals over curves, surfaces and vol- 
umes, etc. Numerous geometrical and physical applications. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 

Open to students who have taken 6. 

9. Analytic Geometry (Second Course). 

A more detailed study of the Conic Sections. Higher plane 
curves. Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions. 
One year, two hours weekly. Four credits. 
Open to students who have taken k and 5, or $. 

10. History of Mathematics. 

One year, one hour weekly. Two credits. 
Open to students who have taken 6. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences SI 



11. Practical Mathematics for Students ln Chemistry. 

Applications of Higher Mathematics to problems in Chemistry. 

Two hours weekly. Four credits. 

Courses 12 and 11 to be given in alternate years. 

12. Practical Mathematics for Students in Physics. 

Applications of Higher Mathematics to problems in physics. 
Two hours weekly. Four credits. 

13. Analytic Mechanics. 

Special attention is paid to the Mathematical theory of Me- 
chanics. 

Open to Graduates. Three hours weekly. Three credits. 

14. Projective Geometry. 

Open to Graduates. Three hours weekly. Three credits. 

15. Teachers' Course. 

Fundamental principles of algebra and geometry. Observa- 
tion of methods of presenting subjects to high school pupils. As- 
signed readings, lesson plans, supervised practice teaching for forty 
hours. 

One semester. Three hours. Three credits. 

16. Elements of Statistical Methods. 

Open to Seniors. One hour weekly, one semester. Two credits. 



PHILOSOPHY 



Psychology. 



An analysis of mental phenomena, individual and social. An 
acquaintance with the methods of psychological experiment. A 
study of the problems of philosophy of mind. 

Required of Sophomores. Two hours a week for one semester. 
Two credits. 



52 College Misericordia 



2. Logic. 



A study of the elements and processes of reasoning. Applica- 
tions of the formal principles and rules of logic. 

Open to Sophomores. Two hours a week for one semester. 
Two credits. 

3. Ethics. 

A study of the psychological conditions of morality, the natural 
law, the moral faculty, the moral standard. Personal and social 
ethics. A criticism of modern ethical systems. 

Required of Juniors. Two hours a week for one semester. 
Two credits. 

A. History of Mediaeval Philosophy. 

A study of the development of Scholastic philosophy. Empha- 
sis on Greek and Patristic elements. An analysis of the Thomistic 
Synthesis with reference to modern philosophical positions. Read- 
ings from sources. 

Required of Seniors. Two hours a week for one semester. 
Two credits. 

5. History op Modern Philosophy. 

A study of modern philosophical systems from Descartes 
through Spencer. Problems of contemporary philosophy. Readings 
from sources. 

Open to Seniors. Two hours a week for one semester. Two 
credits. 

Other courses for major in philosophy will be offered on elec- 
tion. 

6. Aesthetics. 

Reality and its transcendental attributes; definition of the 
Beautiful relation to the Good and the True; objective constituents 
of the Beautiful; the Aesthetic Feeling; definition of art; its re- 
lation to life; Idealism and Realism; the purpose of art; Art and 
Religion; fundamental principles of literary and artistic criticism; 
historical survey; recent and contemporary theories. 

Open to Seniors. One semester, two hours weekly. Two 
credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 53 



Genetic Psychology. 
I 

Aim and methods; analysis of mental development; processes, 
factors, results; application to the training of the child in home 
and school; meaning of development for the ultimate explanation 
of mental life. 

Open to Seniors and Juniors. One semester, two hours weekly. 
Two credits. 



PHYSICS 

1. General Physics. 

Lectures, reading, recitations and laboratory exercises in the 
fundamental principles of the science. 

Open to students who have not offered Physics at entrance. 
Three hours weekly. 

2 . Advanced i Physics. 

Mechanics; Geometrical Optics. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 

Prerequisite: Course 1 or its equivalent. 

3. Heat. 

Thermometry; Calorimetry; Elementary Thermodynamics. 
One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: Course 1 or its equivalent. 

4. Wave, Motion and Sound. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. Prerequisite: 
Course 1. 

5. Ether Waves. 

■•■-—■' — '"'»ius?sy 
Phenomena and laws of interference and diffraction; optical 

instruments; dispersion; spectrum analysis; color phenomena; 

polarization; propagation in crystalline media. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: Courses % and 4. 



54 College Misericordia 



d. Elect ricity. 

One semester, three hours weekly. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: Courses 1 and 3. 

7. Selected Problems Assigned for Investigation, Experimental 
Wofk and Discussion. 

One semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 

8. Brief Course in General Physics. 

One semester. Three hours weekly. Three credits. 
Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

9. Historical Physics. 

This course treats of the beginnings of Physics and its develop- 
ment to modern times. 

One semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 

10. The Teaching of Physics. 

Lectures, recitations and practice work. 

One semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. 



POLITICAL ECONOMY 

Elements of Political Science. 

The nature, origin, basis, functions, and constitution of the 
State; and the chief forms and departments of government. 
One year, two hours a week. Four credits. 

The Economic and Social Activities of the State. 

Legislation concerning commerce, industry, labor, charity, and 
education. 

One year, two hours a week. Four credits. 






Liberal Arts and Sciences 55 



3. Comparative Study of Modern Governments. 

This course embraces an analysis of the problems of self- 
government and a comparative study of the existing systems of 
government in the principal modern states. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

One year, one hour a week. Two credits. 



SOCIOLOGY 

1. Elementary Sociology. 

Study of the social history of the individual for the purpose 
of ascertaining the nature and relations of social facts, institutions, 
forces, and processes. Class papers and instruction are based 
largely on the personal social experience of the student throughout 
the whole normal range of social relations. Study of the wider 
life of society in the light of results thus obtained, with particular 
attention to current social movements and more marked social 
progress. 

One year, two hours weekly. Four credits. 

Economics 1 is a prerequisite for major work in Sociology. 

2. Principles of Relief. 

Study of problems and processes of poverty and of policies 
and principles in the modern development of relief work with 
particular attention to Catholic thought and practice. 

One year, two hours weekly. Four credits. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Elementary Sociology or Economics and Industrial History re- 
quired. Field study and critical reports on methods and literature 
are emphasized throughout. 

5. General Applied Sociology. 

First semester will be devoted to a study of organization and 
methods of relief agencies. The second semester will be devoted 
to the problems of the handicapped child. This course is designed 
for students who intend to take up social and charitable work as 
volunteer or professional workers. Particular attention will be 



56 College Misericordia 



devoted to field work with the relief and children's agencies, the 
Juvenile Court, and hospitals of Wilkes-Barre and vicinity. 

Two hours weekly for class work and eight hours weekly for 
field work. Four credits. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Social Case Work. 

The family as a unit in social work. Factors undermining 
family life. Development of case work technique; investigation; 
planning for families; record keeping. Community resources to be 
used in caring for handicapped families. Special emphasis on recent 
developments of Catholic case working agencies in the United 
States. 

Students intending to take up social work as a profession will 
be required to devote at least one day a week to field work with 
the Catholic Charities of Wilkes-Barre. 

Two hours weekly. Four credits. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Girl Scouts. 

This course is designed to train for leadership according to the 
requirements of The National Girls Scout Association. Study of 
the Girl Scout Activities. 

One semester, two hours weekly. Two credits. Open to Juniors 
and Seniors. 



SPANISH 

1. Elementary Course. 

The fundamental principle? of Spanish grammar, including reg- 
ular verbs and the common irregular verbs; oral instruction in 
Spanish with simple oral reproduction ; dictation ; translation of 
easy prose. 

Two hours a week, each semester. No credit. 

2. Intermediate Course. 

Grammar continued; irregular verbs, syntax of moods and 
tenses; translation of Spanish of ordinary difficulty; practice in 
giving reproductions and paraphrases. 

Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 57 

3. General Course. 

A thorough review of grammar; composition; letter-writing, 
and commercial documents. Outline of the history of Spanish 
literature; readings from P. Alarcon, P. Galdos, Valdes. 

Three hours a week, each semester. 

Course 3 is the freshman course for those who offered Spanish 
for entrance, and is prerequisite for all the more advanced courses 
in literature. Six credits. 

4. General Survey of The Literary and Political History of 
Spain. 

Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

5. Spanish Conversation and Sight Reading. 

One hour a week, each semester. Two credits. 

6. Spanish Literature Before the Golden Age. 

El poema del Cid; La Cronica General; El Poema de Alexan- 
der; the Novela Caballeresca, (Type: El Amadis de Gaula) ; the 
No vela Pastoral (Type: La Diana by Jorge Montemayor) ; religious 
poems and legends. 

Sophomores and Juniors. Two hours a week, each semester. 
Four credits. 

Prerequisite, Course k. 

7. The Spanish Novel of the Golden Age. 

Cervantes selections from Don Quixote and Novelas Ejem- 
plares; the Novelas Picarescas and Spanish realism; selections from 
El Buscon, Guzman de Alfarche, El Lazarillo del Tormes. 

Juniors. Three hours a week, each semester. Six credits. 

Prerequisite, Course 4. 

8. Classic Drama. 

The Golden Age; critical reading of selected works of Lope de 
Vega, Calderon, Moreto, Tirso de Molina, Juan Ruiz de Alarcon. 
Papers on the lives, works and times of these authors. 

Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week, each semester. Four 
credits. 



58 College Misericordia 



9. Drama of the Nineteenth Century. 

Reading and study of some of the principal works of such 
modern Spanish authors as Moratin, Nunez de Arce, Echegaray, and 
others. 

Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week, each semester. Four 
credits. 

10. Latin America. 

Study in Spanish of the lands and people from a geographical 
and historical standpoint with conversation in Spanish based on 
the text read. Collateral reading and reports. 

Two hours a week, each semester. Four credits. 

11. Special Topics in Spanish Literary and Political History. 

The invasion of the Moors into Spain; the Arabic influence on 
literature; effects produced by the political events of the last years 
of the fifteenth and sixteenth century upon the literary life of 
Spain; the discovery and conquest of America; Spanish literature 
in America; America's debt to Spain. 

Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week, each 
semester. Four credits. 

12. Teachers' Course in Spanish. 

Methods of instruction in phonetics and grammar; discussion 
of suitable texts; the teaching of composition; observation and 
methods. 

One hour weekly. Two credits. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences $9 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

To use the library intelligently and skillfully students need 
training. Almost every college subject requires reference reading. 
The ability to find books quickly and to read them wisely are 
worthy goals for those who select courses in this department. 

1. The Use of Books and Libraries. 

A course particularly attractive to Freshmen, wherein they may 
learn the use of the card catalogue, and gain an understanding of 
the Dewey Decimal System of classifying books, together with 
knowledge of the preparation and care of books, acquaintance with 
sets of books for general and for special reference, and skill in mak- 
ing bibliographies. 

Each lesson admits of three hours of practice work in the 
library. 

Teachers' Course in Library Administration. 

An extensive study of the use of books and libraries; the 
classifying and cataloging of books; book selection; ordering of 
books; the care of records; the loan systems, etc. 

From two to three hours of practice work is required with 
each lesson. 

Open to Senior College students. Recommended to those who 
expect to become teacher -librarians. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The purpose of this department is to train young women to 
take positions as teachers, dietitians, institutional managers, and 
home-makers. 

Majors leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics are offered in: Foods and Nutrition, Clothing and 
Textiles, Household and Institutional Management. 

A bulletin of information on Home Economics is in the course 
of preparation and will be sent upon request. 



60 College Misericordia 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Courses in business training will be given according as the 
demand for them warrants. The distinct advantage of a knowledge 
of shorthand and typewriting to the college student, the prospec- 
tive teacher, or the business woman justifies the strong encourage- 
ment of these subjects. 



EXPRESSION 

The study and application of the fundamental principles of correct 
speaking and intelligent reading. This course or its equivalent is re- 
quired of all students. Beginning with the Sophomore year, work in 
this department may receive credit on the basis of two credits for two 
half hour private lessons a week with four hours of practice. 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 61 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The Course of Study embraces: 

1. The Preparatory Course. 

2. The Intermediate Course. 

3. The Teachers' Certificate Course. 

4. The Graduate Course. 

5. The Post Graduate Course. (Degree — Bachelor of Music). 

HONORS AWARDED 

Intermediate Certificate — at the completion of the Intermediate 
Course. 

Teachers' Certificate — at the completion of the Teachers' Certificate 
Course. 

Graduate Diploma — at the completion of the Graduate Course. 

Degree — Bachelor of Music — at the completion of the Post-Gradu- 
ate Course. 

Practical work in piano, violin, organ and voice, if of a sufficiently 
advanced character, may, when taken in connection with prescribed 
theoretical courses, receive eight credits toward a B. A. degree. This 
credit is estimated on the basis of two credits for two half-hour lessons 
a week with six hours of practice. Credit for theoretical courses and 
for history of music may begin in the Sophomore year. The total num- 
ber of credits for theoretical and applied music may not exceed sixteen. 



THEORETICAL COURSES 
Open to Election by Students of the Bachelor of Arts Course 

3-4. Harmony. 

Open to Sophomores. One hour a week for the year. 

5-6. Harmony. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week for the year. 

7-8. Counterpoint. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week for the year. 



62 College Misericordia 

9-10. Composition and Analysis. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week for the year. 

1-2. History of Music. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. One hour a week • 
for the year. 

THE PRACTICAL COURSES 

In piano, violin, organ and voice, which may be elected by students 
of the Bachelor of Arts Course. 

1-8. Preparatory Course. 

For students desiring to prepare for the Intermediate Course. 
No credits. 

9-10. Intermediate Course. 

Practical work fulfilling requirements for the Intermediate Cer- 
tificate. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four credits for the year. 

11-12. Teachers' Certificate Course. 

Practical work fulfilling requirements for the Teachers' Certifi- 
cate. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four credits for the year. 

13.-14. Graduate Course. 

Practical work fulfilling requirements for the Graduate Di- 
ploma. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Four Credits for the year. 

See detailed outline of Theory, History of Music, and Prac- 
tical Music courses in this Bulletin. 






^ 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 



63 



FOR BACHELOR OF MUSIC (MUS. B.) DEGREE 



Freshman Year. 




Sophomore Year. 




Hours 


Hours 




per week 


per week 


♦Practical courses in 


Piano, 




♦Practical courses in Piano, 


Violin, Organ and 


Voice 


2 


Violin, Organ and Voice 2 


Evidences of Religion 


1 


Evidences of Religion 1 


English 




3 


English 3 


Modern Language 




3 


Modern Language 3 


History 




3 


History of Music 1 


Elem. Harmony 




2 


Adv. Harmony 2 


Appreciation 




1 


Elem. Form 1 


Ensemble 




1 


Ensemble 1 


Electives 




2 


Logic 2 
Electives 3 



Junior Year. 




Senior Year. 


Hours 


Hours 


per week 


per week 


♦Practical courses in Piano, 




♦Practical courses in Piano, 


Violin, Organ and Voice 


2 


Violin, Organ and Voice 2 


Evidences of Religion 


1 


Evidences of Religion 1 


Psychology 


2 


Philosophy 2 


Development of the Christian 




Composition and Analysis 2 


Church 


1 


Orchestration 1 


Counterpoint 


2 


Ensemble 1 


Ensemble 


1 


Thesis — on a musical subject. 


Elem. Composition and An- 




History of Art 1 


alysis 


2 


Electives 6 


History of Art 


1 




Electives 


4 





♦ Candidates for certificate or diploma are required to take two priv- 
ate half-hour lessons a week. Students majoring in violin or voice are 
required to take one or two private half-hour lessons a week in piano, 
according to the judgment of the teacher. 



64 College Misericordia 



PIANO DEPARTEMENT 

Students who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the Intermedi- 
ate Course will be classified as belonging to the Preparatory Course. 
All work outlined need not be pursued. Our plan is to adapt instruc- 
tion to the personal needs of each student and it is left to the discre- 
tion of the teacher to choose what material will be essential to the 
development of a musical touch and intelligent style of playing. 

1-8. Preparatory Course. 

In this course special attention is given to the elements of 
piano-forte playing, which includes hand-shaping, touch and nota- 
tion, rhythm, phrasing and ear-training. Technical studies, includ- 
ing scales and triads. Easy sonatinas and pieces from Clementi, 
Dussek, Kuhlau, Gurrlitt. Pieces according to individual needs, 
playing from memory. Harmony 1-2. 

No credit towards Bachelor of Arts degree is given in this 
course. 

9-10. Intermediate Course Pre-Requisite, the Preparatory Course. 

Technical exercises including major and minor scales in various 
• forms. Chords, arpeggios and octaves. 

Etudes from Bertini, Heller, Czerney, Little Preludes by Bach; 
Bach two-part inventions. Sonatinas by Kuhlau and others; 
easier sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 

Harmony 3-4. 

Ensemble, Religion, Modern Language, English, History, Ap- 
preciation and Electives. 

Candidates for Intermediate Certificate are required to play 
for the members of the music faculty a program including a classic, 
a polyphonic, and a romantic selection. 

11.-12. Teachers' Certificate Course. 

Pre-requisite, the Intermediate Course. Technical exercises in- 
cluding Major and Minor scales in different motions and in double 
thirds and sixths; single, contrary and broken arpeggios. Octave 
and pedal studies. 

Etudes selected from Clementi, Czerny, Cramer Bach three part 
inventions, and suites. Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven, Men- 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 65 

delssohn's Songs without Words. Smaller numbers of Schumann, 
Chopin, Grieg, Rubenstein, Liszt, MacDowell and the modern com- 
posers. 

Harmony 5-6. History of Music 1-2. Elementary Form. 
Ensemble, Religion, English, Modern Language, Logic and Elec- 
tives. 

Candidates for Teachers' Certificate are required to play for 
the members of the music faculty a program including a sonata, 
a Bach three-part invention or suite, and two other standard com- 
positions. 

13-14. Graduate Course. 

Pre- requisite, Teachers' Certificate Course. Etudes selected 
from Czerny, Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum, Bach Partitas, Well 
Tempered Clavichord, Beethoven Sonatas, A concerto selected from 
the classic or modern composers. Compositions of Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Chopin, Liszt and the modern composers. Psychology, 
Counterpoint 7-8. Composition and Analysis 9-10. Ensemble, Re- 
ligion, Development of the Christian Church, History of Art and 
Electives. 

15-16. Post-Graduate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Graduate Course. The work done in this 
course in practically the finishing and perfecting of the work al- 
ready commenced, with a view of completing a repertoire. 

Composition 11-12. Orchestration 13-14. A thesis on some 
musical subject, Religion, Philosophy, and Electives. Complete 
public recital. Degree-Bachelor of Music. 

VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Students not sufficiently advanced to enter the Intermediate 
Course will be classed as students of the Preparatory Course. 

Special attention is given in this course to correct bowing, 
position, intonation, the positions, scales, and to the fundamental 
exercises of Sevcik Wohlfahrt, De Boriot, Mazas, with concertinos 
by Seitz. 

Pieces selected according to the ability of the student. 

Elements of Harmony 1-2. 

No credits are given in this course towards the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 



66 College Misericordia 



9-10. Intermediate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Preparatory course. Selected studies from Cas- 
orti, Sitt, Sevcik, and others. Easier sonatas by Mozart and Han- 
del. Standard compositions from classic and modern composers. 
Ensemble, Religion, Modern Language, English, History, Apprecia- 
tion and Electives. 

Candidates for the Intermediate Certificate are required to play 
for the members of the music faculty a short program, an easy 
sonata or concerto movement and two selected pieces. 

11-12 Teachers' Certificate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Intermediate Course. Further development of 
technic, selected studies of Fiorillo, Sitt, Casorti and others. 
Pieces selected from Vieuxtemps, Sarasate and other classic and 
modern composers. Concertos selected from Mozart, de Beriot, 
Rode and others. 

Harmony 5-6. History of Music-12. 

Elementary Form, Ensemble, Religion, English, Modern Lan- 
guage, Logic and Electives. 

Candidates for Teachers' Certificate are required to play for 
the members of the music faculty a program including a sonata, 
a concerto movement and two other standard compositions. 

13-14. Graduate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Teachers' Certificate Course. Etudes of Fiorillo 
and Rode, selected studies of an advanced grade. Sonatas of 
Beethoven Mozart, Grieg and others; concertos of Mozart, Men- 
delssohn, Godard and others. Advanced solo compositions from 
classic, romantic and modern schools. 

Counterpoint 7-8. Composition and Analysis 9-10, Ensemble, 
Religion, Development of the Christian Church, Psychology, His- 
tory of Art and Electives. 

Candidates for Graduate Diploma will present from memory 

Hi 

a short public recital. 

15-16. Post-Graduate Course. (Degree Bachelor of Music) 

Pre-requisite, Graduate Course. More extended study of clas- 
sic and modern compositions, including the more difficult sonatas 
and concertos. 



Liberal Aits and Sciences 67 

Preparation for professional work. 

Religion, Philosophy, Composition 11-12, Orchestration 13-14, 
Ensemble, History of Art and Electives. 

A thesis on some musical subject. Complete public recital. 

VOCAL DEPARTMENT 

Students who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the inter- 
mediate Course will be classified as students of the Preparatory 
Course. Special attention is given in this Course to the elements 
of vocal culture, including correct breathing, tone-placement, and 
diction. Sight-singing, ear-training, elements of Harmony 1-2. 
Vocalises selected from works of Marchesi, Concone and others. 
Songs according to the ability of the student. 

No credit toward Bachelor of Arts Course. 

9-10. Intermediate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Preparatory Course. Studies from Marchesi 
(Italian), Concone or Lamperti. 

Song classics from the Italian, French, German and American 
Schools. 

Ear-training, sight-singing, Diction. Choral Study, Harmony 
3-4. 

Ensemble, Religion, Modern Language, English, History, Ap- 
preciation and Electives. 

Candidates for the Intermediate Certificate are required to sing 
for the members of the music faculty a short program including 
and old Italian classic and a group of sons from the English, French, 
or German and American schools. 

11-12. Teachers' Certificate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Intermediate Course. Further development of 
technic, studies in expression and tone color. Vocalises from Mar- 
chesi, Lamperti and others. Songs, recitatives and arias in English, 
Italian, French or German. Ear-training, Sight-singing, Diction. 
Conducting, accompanying. History of Music 1-2. 

Musical Appreciation, Elementary For, Ensemble, Choral Study, 
Harmony 5-6. Religion, English, Modern Language, Logic and 
Electives. 



68 College Misericordia 

Members of this class must be able to accompany on the piano 
and read vocal music at sight. They will sing for the members of 
the music faculty a program including selections from the song, 
opera and oratorio literature of the classic, romantic and modern 
schools. 

13-14. Graduate Course. 

Pre-requisite, Teachers' Certificate Course. Interpretation of 
songs of classic and modern vocal literature. 

Recitatives and arias from the standard operas and oratorios. 

Ear-training, Sight-singing, Diction. Choral Study, Counter- 
point 7-8. Composition and Analysis 9-10. 

Religion, Development of the Christian Church, Psychology, 
History of Art and Electives. 

Candidates for Graduate Diploma will present from memory a 
short public program. 

15-16. Post Graduate Course. (Degree of Bachelor of Music.) 

Pre-requisite, Graduate Course. 

Development of repertoire. Preparation for professional work. 
Ear-training, Sight-singing, Diction. 

Choral Study, Religion, Philosophy, History of Art, and Elec- 
tives. 

Complete public recital. 

A thesis on a musical subject. 



THEORETICAL DEPARTMENT 

The Courses in Harmony, Counterpoint, Counterpoint, and Orches- 
tration follow the best methods of the most eminent theorists and com- 
posers of modern times. Every effort is made to develop in the student 
the faculty for creative work. 
1-2. Elementary Harmony. 

This course includes the writing and keyboard drill of inter- 
vals; major, minor, and chromatic scales the formation of triads, 
seventh and ninth chords. 

No credit is given for this course. 



College Government 60 



3-4. Harmony. 

The progression of triads, seventh, and ninth chords. The in- 
vention and harmonization of melodies with these materials. 

Required for Intermediate Certificate. Open to Sophomores, 
Juniors and Seniors of the Bachelor of Arts Course. One hour a 
week for the year. 

5-6. Harmony. 

Altered chords, half-step progressions, chromatic chords, 
transition, modulation, non-chord tones, organ point. Original 
melodies and their harmonization. 

Required for Teachers' Certificate. Open to Juniors and Sen- 
iors of the Bachelor of Arts Course. One hour a week for the year. 

7-8. Counterpoint. 

The contrapuntal association of melodies in two, three, four or 
more parts. Double counterpoint. Canon and fugue. 

Required for Graduate Diploma. Open to Juniors and Seniors 
of Bachelor of Arts Course. One hour a week for the year. 

9-10. Composition and Analysis. 

The study of musical form through analysis followed by origi- 
nal work in the smaller song forms. 

Required for Graduate Diploma, Open to Juniors and Seniors 
of the Bachelor of Arts Course. One hour a week for the year. 

11-12. Composition and Analysis. 

The analysis of the rondo forms, the sonata form, and other 
large forms. Free composition in the larger forms. 

Required for Bachelor of Music Degree. One hour a week for 
the year. 

13-14. Orchestration. 

Arranging of scores for the various orchestral instruments. 
Original compositions for the different solo instruments, for instru- 
ments in combination, and for small and large orchestra. 

Required for Bachelor of Music Degree, One hour a week for 
the year. 



70 College Misericordia 



1-2. History of Music. 

Music of Ancient Peoples. Music of the Christian Era, the 
classical, the romantic, and the modern schools. This course com- 
bines recitation and lecture methods. A definite text-book is as- 
signed for study and research from additional authors required. 

Required for Teachers' Certificate. Open to Sophomores, 
Juniors and Seniors of the Bachelor of Arts Course. One hour a 
week for the year. 

1-2. Appreciation of Music. 

This course supplements the History of Music course, illustrat- 
ing its period by means of piano, voice and victrola. 



ORGAN 

Students beginning the study of organ are expected 
to have completed the intermediate course of piano-forte, 
and must continue piano work through at least two years 
of their course The organ studies of Stainer, Clarence 
Eddy and Ritter are used ; Nilson's pedal technic ; various 
organ works of Bach, compositions by Mendelssohn, Guil- 
mant. Dubois, Rheinberger and other standard works of 
the English, French and German schools. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students (those not wishing to work for de- 
grees at the College) may register for instruction in in- 
strumental or vocal music upon consulting the directress 
of music. Special students are eligible to all the advan- 
tages and privileges of the department, including attend- 
ance at classes, recitals and lectures. 

For information in regard to music rates, apply to 
The Directress of Music. 



College Government 71 



LIBRARY 

The library is supplied with books of general and 
specific reference adequate to the needs of College work. 

The loan facilities of the Wilkes-Barre Osterhout Li- 
brary and private collections afford unlimited advantages 
for study and research in any particular field. 

Standard and professional magazines furnish an 
abundance of reading and reference material of popular 
and scholastic significance. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING AND HEALTH 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Physical training is required of every student during 
the Freshman and Sophomore years. As the exercise 
periods are regular academic requirements, they are sub- 
ject to the usual regulations affecting absence and qual- 
ity of work. 

Athletics are obligatory, and out-door exercises must 
be taken daily. 

The recreation and all gymnastics are done under the 
direct supervision of the Director of the department. 

No college credit is given for this course. 

A physical examination is required of each student 
upon entrance. On the basis of this examination advice is 
given as to the amount and kind of exercise best adapted 
to meet the needs of each student. 

HEALTH 

Every care will be taken to safeguard the health of 
the students. Doctor Rosanna McKenney is the regular 
College physician, but the students may select their own 
doctor if they choose. 

A registered Nurse who is resident at the College, ad- 
ministers to the physical needs of the students. 

The cost of medical attendance and of medicine is 
borne by the student, 



72 College Misericordia 



CHORUS SINGING 

Every student is required to attend the class in 
chorus singing which is held once a week. Sight singing, 
ear training and the rudiments of music are studied. 

No college credit is given for this course. 

MUSIC AND DRAMA 

Under suitable chaperonage, and with the consent of 
the parents, the pupils may attend lectures, the opera, 
and concerts. The pupils are prepared for concerts and 
for the more difficult operas by explanatory lectures. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

Extra curricular lectures on literary, historical and 
scientific subjects will be given by specialists in these and 
other fields and the recitals by distinguished artists sup- 
plement the regular work of the College. 

PARLIMENTARY LAW 

A brief course in the principles and practice of par- 
limentary procedure is offered each year. Every student 
is expected to take advantage of this opportunity until 
she has acquired a good working knowledge and practi- 
cal application of the theory in conducting meetings, or- 
ganizing and presiding over clubs and societies. 

COLLEGE GOVERNMENT 

To be admitted to the College a student must be in 
sound health, and give evidence of high moral character. 

Young women of other religious convictions who 
meet our scholastic requirements, and conform to the 
regulations of our College will be admitted. 

The College insists on regularity, exactness, and or- 
der, as qualities, essential to the successful pursuit of 
study, and fundamental in the formation of strong, 



College Government 73 

womanly character. In estimating a student's grade in 
any subject pursued in College, regularity of attendance 
at class exercises receives important consideration. Par- 
ents are urged to co-operate with the College in the ef- 
fort to inculcate in their daughters principles of order, 
and to develop in them habits of regularity and exact- 
ness. This co-operation is especially solicited in regard 
to the exact observance of the limits appointed for the 
vacation and the holidays. Irregularity and inexactness 
at these periods, not only cause serious disadvantage to 
the absentees themselves, but disturb College order and 
discipline, impede the progress of class work, and add to 
the labor of the instructors. 

All students are expected to be earnest and scholarly 
in their work, to conduct themselves with womanly dig- 
nity within and without the College precincts, and to 
show at all times that they are worthy of the generous 
trust which the College authorities repose in them. 

Students may board in the College during the Eastei 
and Christmas recess for one dollar and a half per day. 

No student may receive her diploma or statement 
of her credits until all accounts have been paid. 

Text books, stationery, and music are furnished at 
current prices in the College store. Terms are strictly 
cash as no accounts will be permitted. 

No money is advanced by the College. 

Students will send to the city laundry, or to their 
homes, all bed linens, towels included. Students will 
supply one double blanket, four sheets, four pillow cases, 
towels, and dresser covers for their own rooms; one bed- 
side rug, one napkin holder, one laundry bag. The Col- 
lege furnishes table service. 

No special orders are served in the diningroom ex- 
cept for reason of health. 

Students who entertain friends at the College ar- 
range for them in the office, and pay at the rate of one 
dollar and a half per day. 



74 College Misericordia 



ADVISERS 

Every student is assigned to an adviser, a member 
of the College Faculty, who assists in the arrangement 
of the student's courses at the beginning of both terms. 
and who acts as a general adviser during the year. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Various activities — literary, scientific and musical, 
give variety to the College life. The students meet in the 
parlors for a social hour after dinner every evening. 
This intercourse of the students is under the care of the 
Faculty, and it is the aim of the College to make it a 
means of social culture. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 
THE BISHOP BRENNAN SCHOLARSHIP 

The Right Reverend A. J. Brennan Scholarship — 
Founded in April, 1924, in grateful memory of his be- 
loved parents. 

This scholarship, open to a graduate from St. Agnes 
High School, Towanda, Pennsylvania, entitles the winner, 
upon examination, to the four-year college course. 

ST. MARY'S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP 

The St. Mary's Alumni Scholarship — Founded May 
24, 1924, open to a graduate of St. Mary's High School, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. The student, chosen by 
competitive examination, is entitled to the four-year col- 
lege course. 



College Government 7$ 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to College Misericordia, a cor- 
poration established by law, in the State of Pennsylvania, 

County of Luzerne, the sum of $ to 

be safely invested by it for a scholarship or for the Col- 
lege Building and Endowment Fund, to be known as 



Signed, 



axnaw& 




1 '^m 







MHHNB 



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